Object of the Day

Locks Towing Locomotive

The reverse of this postcard contains a handwritten caption that reads, “Panama Canal U.S. 662 Locks towing Locomotive”. Is there additional information that we should add to this photograph’s record?

2013.11.2_0001

 

If you can, please share with us in the comments section!

0 Comments

  • bkarrer2013

    The is NO “G”…. it is 662. It is one of early obnes thart were retired showeertly after the new ones came in during the 1960s. Bob K

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    From: The Panama Canal Museum Collection at UF [mailto:comment-reply@wordpress.com] Sent: Friday, April 04, 2014 12:48 PM To: bkarrer@comcast.net Subject: [New post] Locks Towing Locomotive

    ufpcmcollection posted: “The reverse of this postcard contains a handwritten caption that reads, “Panama Canal U.S. G62 Locks towing Locomotive”. Is there additional information that we should add to this photograph’s record? If you can, please share with us in t”

  • Robert Dixon Gordon

    Those latest locomotives used at the locks were bought from a chines firm called Mitsubishi, by the new canal administration. I have noticed that they handle the Panamax vessels very well. What I did not like about them, is that whenever they release a ship they would head back to the other end of the locks at full speed in order to move more ships, disregarding the safety of locks personnel. This issue has being writing up by the canal security guards constantly. Robert Dixon, sector-B, Guard
    leader.

  • Fred Sill

    From the photo, it’s one of the “original” mules, on display. I say original, because later models had a little small platform (with a step for easy access from either side) at each end. These were added after a mule operator had made a mis-step, and was run over by his own mule. Fred Sill

  • Waldo Gilley (Mech Supv Pacific Locks)

    Japan started making the replacement LOCOS in early 1960s. Gatun got the first 6. When I went to work on LOCKS in 1963 at Pedro Miguel. They still had the original “MULES” in service. The original used different cycle elect. 25 cycle changed to 60 cycle for new Japan mfg LOCOS.

  • Bill Fall

    No. 662 was retired in the 1960s and donated to the St Louis Transport Museum in St Louis MO where it is currently on display as one of the 5 surviving examples (644, 645, 662, 672 & 686) of the 70 first generation towing locomotives. I visited and took pictures last summer. Looks great with a new coat of paint. Three are on the Isthmus and 686 is in the Museum of Transportation in Roanoke, VA.

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