Research and Resources

  • Research and Resources

    New Online Resources

    Hello, PCMC members! We have two new online resources to share.

    The first is a list of Spanish American War veterans buried at the Corozal American Cemetery in Panama. The list was compiled by the Friends of the PCMC. These were SAW veterans who subsequently came to Panama to live and work on the Canal. You can find the link here: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pcm/SAWVets_2019March6.pdf.

    These veterans have also been added to our list of Zonians in the Military, available at https://cms.uflib.ufl.edu/pcmc/links/MilitaryZonians.

    The second new resource is an annotated bibliography of books about the American period of the Panama Canal (1904-1999), compiled by Elizabeth Bemis. The bibliography is an ongoing effort, and we continue to find and add resources. You can view the bibliography here: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/spec/pcm/PCBibliography2019.pdf.

    corozal

    Corozal Cemetery

  • Research and Resources

    Fossils of Panama

    Fossils of Panama is an initiative of the Florida Museum of Natural History Fossils in the Cloud Project – an effort to digitize the museum’s paleontological collections.

    The Florida Museum of Natural History, on UF’s campus, has a fantastic fossil collection, and many interesting fossils from Panama.  You can find the Fossils of Panama page here:

    http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/panama-pire/fossils-of-Panama/default.htm

    Check out their digitized collection of Panama fossils, as well as the field guides to common fossils of the Gatun formation.

  • Research and Resources

    Pirates of the Original Panama Canal

    Pat Kearns sent us a wonderful article featured in Archaeology Magazine.  Follow the link to give it a read.

    Pirates of the Original Panama Canal: 
    Searching for the remains of Captain Henry Morgan’s raid on Panama City
    (Courtesy Captain Morgan Rum Co.) Fort San Lorenzo guarded the mouth of the Chagres River—the “original Panama Canal”—for more than 100 years, though it was sacked several times, including by Henry Morgan.
    From Archaeology Magazine
    (Courtesy Captain Morgan Rum Co.)
    Fort San Lorenzo guarded the mouth of the Chagres River—the “original Panama Canal”—for more than 100 years, though it was sacked several times, including by Henry Morgan.
    (Courtesy Fritz Hanselmann, Texas State University, Photo: Donnie Reid) Cannons lifted from the water near Fort San Lorenzo could be the first archaeological evidence of Henry Morgan’s attack on Panama City, which shook the geopolitics of the New World.
    From Archaeology Magazine
    (Courtesy Fritz Hanselmann, Texas State University, Photo: Donnie Reid)
    Cannons lifted from the water near Fort San Lorenzo could be the first archaeological evidence of Henry Morgan’s attack on Panama City, which shook the geopolitics of the New World.
    (Courtesy Captain Morgan Rum Co.) The cannons retrieved from Lajas Reef are being conserved in a laboratory in Panama City. Those freed of concretion display marks that are consistent with the kinds of armaments Henry Morgan’s ships would have carried.
    From Archaeology Magazine
    (Courtesy Captain Morgan Rum Co.)
    The cannons retrieved from Lajas Reef are being conserved in a laboratory in Panama City. Those freed of concretion display marks that are consistent with the kinds of armaments Henry Morgan’s ships would have carried.

    If you have an interesting current event article to share, let us know and it may end up in a post!

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